Tag Archives: awlcraft 2000

Testing for Compatibility of Topside Paint with Awlgrip Topcoat

SURFACE PREPARATION
COATINGS COMPATIBILITY & ADHESION
TESTS (ABOVE WATER ONLY)


Test One: Cross Hatch Adhesion (See diagram above)

  1. Select test area(s) on the surface to be painted. Thoroughly clean,
    de-wax and degrease this area.
  2. With a sharp blade, cut 6 lines vertically and 6 lines horizontally to give
    a box of 25 squares. The cuts must be deep enough to reach the
    substrate. On thick fairing systems this test may have to be done to
    several different layers.
  3. Apply 3M #610, #895 or #898 3M Scotch Brand Filament Tape (or
    similar type of packaging tape) over the scribed area, making certain
    that the tape is tightly adhered to the test surface. Do not use
    masking tape.
  4. With an abrupt yank, pull the tape back parallel to the surface. Pulling
    the tape straight up will give no test at all.
  5. Examine the test surface. If any square of old coating in the scribed
    area is removed, the adhesion has failed. All the failed layers must
    be removed.

Test Two: Solvent Resistance

  1. Saturate a cotton ball or small wad of cloth with one of the
    Awlgrip Topcoat or Primer Reducers (T0003 or T0006).
  2. Tape the reducer-saturated ball to the scribed area surface for
    30 minutes.
  3. After 30 minutes remove the cotton ball. If the reducer has dissolved
    or severely softened the old coating, the coating is incompatible and
    must be removed. If the scribed area has remained intact, allow a
    15 minute recovery period and repeat all steps in Test One again.
  4. If any square areas are removed, all the failed layers must be
    removed.

Test Three: Coating Compatibility
If the old coating is still intact after Tests One and Two, perform
Test Three.

  1. Lightly sand a small test area with 220 grit paper. Clean the sanded
    areas thoroughly with Awlgrip Wipe-Down Solvent (NA/AP:
    Awlprep T0008 ; EU: Surface Cleaner T0340) and using clean cloths.
  2. Paint a small patch of the surface with Awlgrip Topcoat. Do not use
    masking tape on the edges of the test application as the paint edges
    created by the tape will ‘print through’ and be visible in the finish.

Awlgrip vs. Awlcraft 2000 – What are the differences?

Awlgrip and Awlcraft 2000 – Which is better?

Awlgrip and Awlcraft 2000 are two different types of urethane topcoats manufactured by Awlgrip. Each one has its own advantages and disadvantages and when trying to decide which to apply, it is important to know the differences between them.

Awlgip Marine PaintsAwlgrip is based on a polyester urethane resin and Awlcraft 2000 is based on an Acrylic Urethane resin. At the surface they seem very similar, but at the molecular level they are vastly different. Polyester molecules are much smaller than acrylic molecules. This means that at any given volume, there can be more polyester molecules than acrylic and this allows polyester films to be more dense and tough. Awlgrip has more abrasion and chemical resistance than Awlcraft and is usually more rigid.

Awlcraft, on the other hand is not without its own advantages.  It is generally easier to apply. The larger molecules and less dense film of the acrylic allows for faster drying and therefore less dust entrapment in the finish.  Both urethane topcoats will resist staining and provide a long lasting gloss. It is best to consider cure times, reparability, application methods, chemical resistance, as well as abrasion resistance when deciding which topcoat to choose.

Which is more suited for buffing?

Both Awlgrip and Awlcraft 2000 urethane topcoats have a protective resin layer. This layer is the first line of defense against UV light and abrasive damage. Underneath this resin is a layer of rich pigment particles that give the paint its bright shine and color. Awlgrip has a thicker protective resin layer and when the polyester is scratched, it is necessary to cut deeply into the resin to repair it. Buffing the surface leaves the pigment exposed and compromises the performance of the paint in the long run.

Awlcraft has a softer finish, due to the less dense molecular structure, and thus has a lower melting point. When this acrylic urethane is buffed, the resin is able to flow together and does not require cutting the surface as deeply. So, Awlcraft 2000 is more suited for buffing and Awlgrip will require a Fairing Compound.

Awlgrip vs Awlcraft 2000 – Fast Facts

Awlgrip Polyester Urethane Topcoat

  • Can be applied by spray or brush/roll.
  • Excellent color retention and chemical resistance.
  • More dense molecular structure.

Awlcraft 2000 – Acrylic Urethane Topcoat

  • For spray application only.
  • Superior flow-out and high gloss.
  • Fast drying to reduce dust entrapment.
  • More user friendly in application. Easy to repair.

Awlgrip Color Chart

 

Restoring and Maintaining Awlgrip and Awlcraft 2000 Paint

Over time contaminants can build up and cause the finish of your Awlgrip/Awlcraft 2000 paint to appear dull.  You can restore the gloss of a freshly painted boat and prevent the premature aging caused by contaminates by following these steps:

  • Wash your Awlgrip or Awlcraft surface with Awlwash mixed with water (1-2 capfuls in a bucket of water for washing) using soft, non-abrasive cloths and rinse well. Doing so on a regular basis (once per month) will help control dulling buildup.
  • Solvent cleaning of Awlgrip only: Awlprep and Awlprep Plus can be used to aid in removal of stains or markers and to soften or remove heavy build ups of grease and grime, or spray paint on the topcoat and toluene, lacquer thinner, M.E.K., acetone can be used as well.
  • Solvent cleaning of Awlcraft 2000 and Awlgrip HDT only: Awlprep or mild solvents (mineral spirits, xylene, kerosene and diesel fuel) should be used.

Awlgrip AWLwashIn both cases apply solvents with soft cloths and do not allow the chemicals to dry on surface, puddle or soak. Wash with Awlwash to prevent remaining solvent to attack paint. As always when working with solvents, test in an inconspicuous area first.

 Distilled white vinegar and hot water will aid in removing salt stains, always follow with Awlwash.

Protecting the Surface

awlgrip awlcareAwlcare can be applied to the surface like a wax to remove pollutants (such as diesel soot), protects the finish and leaves a glossy shine. Awlcare should be applied regularly to protect against pollutants. It can be removed with Awl-Prep Plus (Awlgrip only) when it’s time to repaint. What to avoid with Awlgrip and Awlcraft 2000:

  • Abrasives
  • Polishing compounds
  • Traditional waxes as they tend to break down rapidly, yellow and attract dirt
  • Acid based products such as teak or metal cleaners and strong solvents on Awlcraft 2000, Awlbrite Clear or Awlspar Varnish.
  • Trapped moisture from supplies as paint can blister or delaminate

AVOID:

  • Avoid Traditional Waxes
  • Awlgrip topcoat only: Regular applications of Awlcare will help temporarily seal and restore shine to painted surfaces that have become porous due to age or mistreatment, helping to maintain a satisfactory appearance until there is time to repaint.
  • Awlcraft 2000 and Awlgrip HDT: Awlcare Protective Polymer Sealer will help maintain the gloss on these finishes with regular applications, especially those which have been buffed or polished. Remember, Awlcare is only applied and buffed by hand. Never apply or buff Awlcare with a machine.
  • Avoid abrasive and polishing compounds
  • Avoid strong solvents (eg. lacquer thinner, M.E.K., acetone) to clean Awlcraft 2000, Awlgrip HDT, Awlbrite Clear or Awlspar varnish.