Tag Archives: gelcoat restoration

Aqua Buff 1000-W and Aqua Buff 2000

If you are looking to remove some unwanted scratches on your boat or to bring back shine into your gelcoat, Aqua Buff is for you!

Aqua Buff is a polishing compound that we offer it in two variations: Aqua Buff 1000-W and Aqua Buff 2000. It is mainly used as a way to remove heavy oxidation, sanding scratches, and swirl marks from gelcoat. There are no oils or polymers in Aqua Buff, so the surface you see is the true surface.

The Aqua Buff 1000-W is used for deep scratches and heavy oxidation. It has a blue-green color which is why is not recommended for white hulls. Use Aqua Buff 1000-F on white surfaces. Aqua Buff 1000-W removes 320 – 600 grit scratches.

Aqua Buff 2000 is used for finer scratches, swirl marks, and light oxidation. Use it to remove 1000 grit scratches and higher. Cleans and removes scratches from Fiber-Reinforced-Plastic parts, metals, and painted surfaces. It is strong enough for most uses and provides a shiny finish.

Application Instructions

  1. Apply a small portion of Aqua–Buff 1000-W or 2000 on the surface using a brush or microfiber cloth (stick to a small area)
  2. Use a spray bottle to mist the surface with water. Only use about a coin-size amount of compound per square foot.
  3. Immediately machine buff* with a clean, damp, compound pad.
    Use wool or wool/blend pads only.

*Use machine buffers that generate at least 2500 rpm for best results.

For the best techniques and tips on how to apply Aqua Buff please watch the video below.

Removing Stains from Gelcoat

A gelcoat surface is a very smooth, mirror-like finish when it is new. As gelcoat ages, it becomes porous which means the more easily it stains, the worse it looks and the harder it is to clean. Most all gelcoat can be restored, providing it is not completely worn through. Exhaust stains, like diesel, can develop on the surface of the Gel Coat. These stains can set in on the wax surface of the gel coat but the right cleaner can remove them. If the stain goes deeper, a bit of elbow grease will be needed.

Clean and inspect the surface with a wash with a mild cleaner like 3M’s boat soap or some alternative stronger cleaners if needed. After cleaning, dry and inspect surface for needs to be addressed: scratches, dings, cracking and crazing and to fix these flaws before rubbing out the gelcoat and restoring its shine. See the fiberglass/gelcoat repair section for options and the West System Video for “how to” instruction.

Apply a fiberglass stain remover, like 3M Fiberglass Restorer and Wax , Mothers Marine Black Streak Remover, or 3M Marine Cleaner and Wax to the stained gelcoat area with a clean rag. The black/gray stains are the result of soot being deposited on your hull. It can happen when wet exhaust systems mix the exhaust gases with seawater and discharge those gases or dry exhaust systems discharging the soot directly into the atmosphere and it lands on your boat.

These liquid one-step products that combine a polish or compound with a wax remove oxidation, and protect the gelcoat in one step.

Wait 10-15 minutes. If the stain is simply laying on the surface of the Gel Coat, the stain will begin to loosen; rinse and inspect the results.

If the stain is lifting, repeat. If not, then something stronger like a more abrasive compound with a polisher may be needed; in that case a wax will be needed to restore the shine. Each time compound products are used, some of the gelcoat is removed. Use caution to use the least aggressive product that will get the job done. Frequently all that may be needed is to apply a protective coating of wax, such as 3M Ultra Performance WaxScotchgard Marine Wax, or Mothers Marine Synthetic Wax to help keep that shine.

For more gelcoat restoration tips see our how to Maintain and Restore Gelcoat link.