Aqua Buff 1000-W and Aqua Buff 2000

If you are looking to remove some unwanted scratches on your boat or to bring back shine into your gelcoat, Aqua Buff is for you!

Aqua Buff is a polishing compound that we offer it in two variations: Aqua Buff 1000-W and Aqua Buff 2000. It is mainly used as a way to remove heavy oxidation, sanding scratches, and swirl marks from gelcoat. There are no oils or polymers in Aqua Buff, so the surface you see is the true surface.

The Aqua Buff 1000-W is used for deep scratches and heavy oxidation. It has a blue-green color which is why is not recommended for white hulls. Use Aqua Buff 1000-F on white surfaces. Aqua Buff 1000-W removes 320 – 600 grit scratches.

Aqua Buff 2000 is used for finer scratches, swirl marks, and light oxidation. Use it to remove 1000 grit scratches and higher. Cleans and removes scratches from Fiber-Reinforced-Plastic parts, metals, and painted surfaces. It is strong enough for most uses and provides a shiny finish.

Application Instructions

  1. Apply a small portion of Aqua–Buff 1000-W or 2000 on the surface using a brush or microfiber cloth (stick to a small area)
  2. Use a spray bottle to mist the surface with water. Only use about a coin-size amount of compound per square foot.
  3. Immediately machine buff* with a clean, damp, compound pad.
    Use wool or wool/blend pads only.

*Use machine buffers that generate at least 2500 rpm for best results.

For the best techniques and tips on how to apply Aqua Buff please watch the video below.

Which Fiberglass Cloth to Choose?

Depending on the job at hand, we offer a few types of fiberglass cloth to choose from and different cloths are used for different jobs. They are available in different widths and are sold by the roll or yard.

Mat– This mat is used for parts and is great for not showing fiberglass patterns through gelcoat. Mat has many small fibers thrown together on a binder and is the most used, basic cloth. There is no specific direction to the fibers, making them strong and light. Sold in ¾ oz up to 2 oz thickness.

Woven Roving-This weave has long fibers weaved together like a cloth. It is extremely thick and durable making it heavier than other fiberglass materials. This often shows pattern through gelcoat and is used for heavy duty items. Sold in 18 and 24 oz thickness.

Double Bias Non Woven- 1808, the first number is the woven roving thickness (18oz) and 08 is the mat thickness (3/4 oz). This is a combination of woven roving on one side and mat on the other, making it very durable and usually used for boat and house decks as it is very rigid.

Fiberglass Cloth– This is sold in 4, 6, 8 and 10 oz thickness an is very fine. While being rigid it also used for anything that is see-through, such as surfboards as it’s thin, lightweight, and shows well with clear resin.

How to Paint your Fiberglass Pool Steps

The finish of your fiberglass pool steps can fade after years of use and exposure to pool chemicals and the weather. If you notice that your pool steps are looking tacky it might be time for you to repaint them. There are a couple of ways you can go about doing this.

You can use Gel Coat if your pool steps currently have gel coat or bare fiberglass. We offer two different brands Gel Coat by Sea Hawk and Ultra Plus Brushable Gel Coat by FGCI.

See the article How to Apply Gelcoat’ for more details on how to use gel coat.

Tips for Using Brushable Gelcoat

Brushable Gelcoat is a specially formulated product that is made to be applied like paint and eliminate the need for spray equipment. It has excellent leveling, Water/Osmosis resistance, UV light Stability, great Gloss Retention and a fantastic long-term durability and is available in a variety of colors. Here are some tips for successful brushable gelcoat application.

Applying Gelcoat by Brush or Roller – (Use a Brushable Gelcoat) When applying gelcoat by brush or roller, we recommend the Ultra Plus Brushable Gelcoat. (other Gelcoats are best applied by Spray) The Ultra Plus Brushable Gelcoat is designed to self-leveling and is much easier application. It allows for a much smoother finish and less time finishing the gelcoat. It is easy to use for the “do it your selfers’! Choose a good pure (natural) resin resistant bristle brush with tapered ends. Avoid brushes that are either too stiff or too soft. For most work, a 3″ or 4″ wide brush will suffice. If there is a trim color, you should have a narrow trim brush on hand. Our Brushable Gelcoat comes with MEKP hardener with every purchase, but you may need more which you can purchase as an option depending on the application, temperature and other environmental factors. Gelcoat needs to be applied evenly. We suggest a thickness of 18-20 mils to properly cure. The thickness of the matchbook cover is approximately 18 mils. If you’re not sure how thick it is, pick up a mil gauge. This is a simple, easy way to see the thickness of your gelcoat.

  1. Don’t add Patch Booster or Sanding Aid (wax). You don’t need to add sanding aid (wax) to Brushable gelcoat to have it dry tack free. The self-leveling technology added doesn’t require any additional products or additives.
  2. Proper gelcoat application requires you apply your coats about 15-20 mils thick. We offer mil gauge for purchase.
  3. Allow the gelcoat to cure overnight and then lightly sand it and buff it for an outstanding shine!
  4. Use Acetone for your cleanup. Just like other Polyester-based products, Acetone is the best cleanup material!
  5. The most important step: Adding the proper amount of Catalyst. We recommend 1.5%-2% Catalyst ratio. After adding the catalyst, you will want to mix for two minutes, preferably with a mechanical agitator (drill mixer). For your reference, here is the catalyst chart so you know exactly how much catalyst you need.

Tips
1 mL = 1 ccIf using wood mixing stick, place stick in resin before adding catalyst so wood doesn’t absorb catalystOnly catalyze slightly more than needed. Resin that cures still in the mixing pot is unusable.

Be sure to have a good strategy when applying your gelcoat. Once you mix and catalyze, you have about 15 minutes to apply the gelcoat before it starts getting hard or starts to “gel.” The actual working time depends on the amount of catalyst and how hot the working conditions are. Anything below 60 degrees, and your gelcoat will not cure, but as you get warmer and warmer, your working time will decrease rapidly. At 70 degrees, you get 15 minutes, but at 90 degrees, you only get 5 minutes. If you need more time to work, be sure to sit the can in some cold ice water to cool it down to 60 degrees to allow you a little more working time.

Here are some helpful tips on how to work with brushable gelcoat, especially during the warmer months.

  1. Cooling the gelcoat, by refrigerating the product to around 70 degrees, will give you up to 15 minutes of working time.
  2. Humidity can be another factor, so, make sure the mold and surrounding area is dry before applying your brushable gelcoat.
  3. Make small batches of gelcoat at a time and catalyze at 1 ½ % to avoid the material from getting hotter. When spraying the gelcoat, make sure you catalyze at 2 %. If you choose to use Duratec, please note, the product must be cool as well.
  4. If you seek to roll on the gelcoat, the product should be applied evenly at 14 mil thick.
  5. Do not apply gelcoat in direct sunlight.

Gelcoat Did Not Cure – What Caused It and What’s Next?

brushable gelcoat

For many “do-it-yourselfers,” applying gelcoat can be quite intimidating. It not as simple as painting and can be somewhat difficult to work with. One of the most frustrating problems to deal with is a new application of gelcoat that refuses to harden and cure. When one of our customers has a problem with gelcoat not curing properly, it usually stems from one of the reasons below.

What Caused it?

Incorrect Surface PreparationGelcoat will only adhere to fiberglass, previously cured gelcoat, or polyester resin. Do not apply gelcoat to any paint or protective coating because it will not adhere. Existing paint will have to be removed.

In order to prepare the surface correctly it must be sanded. The heavier fast-cut grits (40/80/100) are used to feather sand and ground out a routed area prior to filling. Also, they are used for the first sanding of gouges, scratches, and blisters. When sanding areas that have been filled with putty we suggest using 40 or 80 grit sandpaper, depending on how large the repair is. You should also feather the surrounding area of the gelcoat repair with 220/330. When sanding flat areas use a rubber block. Use 3M Abrasives for best results.

Next, clean the surface with or Acetone. All surfaces must be clean, dry and free from grease, wax, oil, and other foreign matter. At this point, the repair is ready to spray or brush with gelcoat.

Not enough catalyst – Most gelcoat manufacturers list the amount of catalyst (MEKp) it requires on the side of the can. If you are unable to find a chart, you can use the two charts listed below. We recommend 1.5% – 2.0 % by volume. The Ideal range is 1.8% @ 77°F (approximately 12 drops per ounce of gelcoat.) If the gelcoat does not get enough catalyst it will not “kick” or begin to harden. Measurements need to be exact so you can be confident the gelcoat is mixed properly before applying it to the surface. If the measurement is off even slightly, the gelcoat could start to harden but not cure completely, leaving a tacky, non-sandable surface.

Too much catalyst – It is also possible to add too much catalyst (over catalyzing) to the mixture. This will cause the gelcoat to start curing in the can or while you are applying the gelcoat. It could happen when mixing larger batches of gelcoat since this is a chemical reaction that gets hot and cures quickly. Always mix in small batches. You should catalyze your material so that it cures as quickly as possible within your working time. Generally mix one-pint batches. Under catalyzation slows down the curing process and causes fading and chalking in the final product. Double check that the amount of catalyst you plan to add is correct for the amount of gelcoat you have set aside. Remember that gelcoat will react differently depending on the ambient air temperature. For warmer weather use less MEKp and for cooler weather use more MEKp to get the correct mixture. (See charts below.) It is always a good idea to keep your gelcoat at room temperature, especially prior to application. A good practice is to pour the mixed gel coat from the mixing container into another container used for application. This further assures that no uncatalyzed material is clinging to the sides of the pot.

Tips
1 mL = 1 cc If using wood mixing stick, place stick in resin before adding catalyst so wood doesn’t absorb catalyst. Only catalyze slightly more than needed. Resin that cures still in the mixing pot is unusable.

MEPk Levels
Note the size and temperature variables.
For Darker Colors – use 2% MEKp


Did not use a surfacing agent – In order to cure properly most gelcoat requires the use of a surfacing agent on the final coat. The most common type of surfacing agent is Wax Additive Sanding Aid. This wax additive seals off the surface from oxygen in the air, allowing the gelcoat to dry tack-free. The recommended ratio is 1 oz wax to 1 quart of gelcoat. The first coat of gelcoat does not need the wax since you will apply a second coat. When mixing gelcoat for the second coat, though, don’t forget to add in the wax additive. All Gelcoats from the Bottom Paint Store come with the MEKP catalyst and wax additive sanding aid, but additional amounts can be purchased. If you don’t add a wax additive to the final coat (or only coat) of gelcoat it will not harden. This is true even if you added the correct amount of catalyst.

Ultra Plus Brushable Gelcoat by FGCI is one exception to this because it does not require a surfacing agent/ wax additive, but still requires the correct amount of catalyst.  Just let it sit overnight to ensure it’s completely cured.

Not enough mils – For best results, apply the gelcoat to a wet film thickness of 25 mils. This will result in a cured film thickness of 18-22 mils. As gelcoat cures it gives off heat in an exothermic chemical reaction. If the gelcoat is applied to thin, it will not reach the temperature needed and will not cure fully. A mil is equal to 0.001″ or one thousandth of an inch. You can use a Wet film thickness gauge to find the thickness of your wet gelcoat. Press the edge of the gauge into the gelcoat until it touches the surface below. Look at the teeth on the gauge. The gelcoat’s current thickness is measured by noting the highest tooth with film on it and the next highest tooth with no film on it. For example, a mil gauge is labeled 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 mils. The only teeth with gelcoat on them are 10 and 15. So the gelcoat’s thickness is between 15 and 20 mils.

What’s Next?

Can I apply more gelcoat over uncured gelcoat? No. Applying more gelcoat will not help the first layer cure. Most likely it will need to be removed and reapplied.

What can I try to get the gelcoat to cure? Allow more time. If something wasn’t exactly right, the gelcoat may just take a few days to harden. If it’s not rock-solid in a few days, though, you may have to scrape it off and reapply it.

How can I remove uncured gelcoat? Acetone on a rag can be used to break down the gelcoat. Use a plastic putty knife to scrape the uncured gelcoat away.

Read More:

Click this link to read How to Apply Gelcoat

Click this link to read Clear Coat My Bass Boat

Teak Oil vs. Teak Sealer – What’s the difference?

Well maintained teak woodwork is highly prized and teak wood owners who want to do everything they can to keep it looking great. However, the market is saturated with many teak products and it can be confusing to know which will work best for you. This article can be your guide to teak oil and teak sealer.

What is teak oil?

Teak oil has been used on boats and teak wood furniture for many years. Teak oils are usually made of tung oil or linseed oil with extra additives mixed in. The oil “feeds” the wood, in a sense, and accentuates the grain and color. Thus, applying oil to teak gives it a warm and rich look. Many people choose to oil their teak because they like the beauty that oil can bring back. However, teak oil is very high maintenance. Teak Oil does not protect the wood, but it merely recovers the rich appearance that teak wood can offer. This method requires multiple coats of oil and the beautiful finish does not last long. Sunlight and UV rays carbonize the oils, turning the wood finish dark and gray over time. Gradually, the bright and warm look that you worked so hard to attain is lost once again.

What is teak sealer?

Another method of caring for teak wood is using a teak sealer. Sealers are different from oils because they do not “feed” the wood more oils or resins. Instead, they seal in the oils and resins that the existing wood contains while at the same time preventing contaminants and moisture from harming it. Sealer does need to be reapplied nearly as often as oil. It is best to keep a nice coating of teak sealer on the wood by reapplying every year.

Which teak sealer product should I use?

JustTeak™ is a marine-grade teak cleaning system that quickly and easily rejuvenates your teak. It will clean, brighten, and (using a sealer) protect your teak decking and outdoor teak furniture.

Part 1: Teak Cleaner

Renews your valuable teak, removing stains, greying and old coatings, whilst being gentle on your teak.

Part 2: Teak Brightener

Removes light stains and greying. Brightens teak when used in combination with JustTeak™ Teak Cleaner.

Part 3: Teak Sealer

Ensures a beautiful, natural finish that protects your teak from sun, rain and stains. You will also prolong your teak from turning grey. Teak Sealer can be easily removed with JustTeak™ Teak Cleaner and Teak Brightener when it is time to re-apply.

Save 10% on our Teak Sealer Restoration Kits

What to Use on the Deck of My Boat?

Over time the life of any boat there will come a time when the deck needs to be renewed. You have a choice of non-skid additives, or paints that already contain nonskid compound.  A non skid boat deck helps protect the surface as well as the occupants.

Looking for a non skid surface you have many options. If your boat floor is currently gelcoat you can regelcoat the surface with or without a non skid additive. More information about gelcoat application can be found here. Gelcoat is more durable than paint and once a gelcoat surface is painted gelcoat will not adhere.

If paint is desired non skid can be added to our marine paints by Duralux and Awlgrip. Often an exact match can be found to your hull paint color. Find more topside paint options available and detailed instructions on adding non skid found in our how to section.

Customers painting the floor of a jon boat, frequently use the Aluma Hawk aluminum paint with a non skid additive. This paint serves as a paint and primer in one for your aluminum surface.

Depending on your paint choices, follow the manufacturers application instructions whether applying to aluminum, fiberglass, or wood to insure best adhesion and slip resistance.

Antifouling Paint or Prop Glide for Outdrives?

Which method of protective propeller coating is best for your boat? While there is no right or wrong solution, there are a few things to consider before making your decision.

Important questions to ask:

  1. Do you haul and repaint your boat every year?
  2. Does the prop see regular use?

Antifouling Paint – If you answered NO to the second question, you will likely be better off with traditional antifouling paint protecting your outdrive. Slick film coatings need to see regular use in order to repel fouling successfully. And if you answered YES to the first question, the additional cost of slick film coatings may not be worth it for you.

Which antifouling products are recommended for outdrives? Here are two good options.

Option 1 – Apply Tuff Stuff epoxy primer (or similar primer) direct to the metal. Paint over with a copper free bottom paint such as Smart Solution. (It is very important to only use a copper-free bottom paint. Copper-based paints on underwater metals will experience galvanic corrosion.) This option guarantees the best protection and longest lasting coverage, but the paint will need to be recoated each season depending on prop usage.

Option 2 – Apply an aerosol underwater metal coating such as Barnacle Blocker or Pettit Barnacle Barrier. These are relatively inexpensive coatings that could provide a large amount of pay off.

PropGlide™ Propeller and Running Gear Coatings – If you answered YES to the second question above then you may want to give foul-release systems a try. These are non-toxic, slick coatings that prevent growth from attaching itself to the prop and running gear, thus improving your boat speed and fuel efficiency. It is important to note that for PropGlide to keep its slick quality and repel fouling, the prop needs to see regular use. Without the pesticide coatings of traditional bottom paint, a stationary prop is an easy target for barnacles and other organisms. While slick film coatings may not be the solution for all boaters, many have tried it and had great success. Note what some PropGlide users have stated below.

“For over a year, we at the Big Boat Shed ship repair and storage yard for vessels up to 60ft have been trialing out PropGlide. We have found it very user friendly and has a better finish when compared to its competitors. With our tropical humid conditions we could not have asked for a better drying time then what PropGlide offers. This allows us to plan prepare and execute any prop coating task with PropGlide such a breeze. PropGlide is now our main recommended brand for propeller and running gear antifouling coatings.” 3/8/2017

“We applied PropGlide to the propellers and rudders on our 42′ power catamaran in March 2016. We have found excellent results so far with very little growth appearing on the running gear. We have been able to maintain great boat speed, excellent economy and no vibrations unlike previous years with using other products. Our Applicator has even commentated how much easier PropGlide is to apply compared to its competitors.” Mick Malone 9/28/2016

Click this link to compare the price of Propspeed kits and PropGlide™ Propeller Paint Kits.
Click this link to read about Painting an Aluminum Outdrive

What Should be Applied to a Baptismal Pool, Water Fountain or Small Pond?

Usually, a baptismal pool is made of fiberglass and coated with gelcoat. The gelcoat can be either be restored or new gelcoat can be applied. How do you know which is best? New gelcoat is recommended if it is worn too thin or a new color is desired. Our brushable gelcoat is very user friendly and Sea Hawk gelcoat can be sprayed or brushed. See our article in gelcoat application for more details.

A water fountain or small pond is usually holding water so swimming pool paint is recommended. It is perfectly safe for fish once the paint is fully cured. Not sure which pool paint to use? Use this guide to help.

What Products Do I Use to Paint a Livewell?

A livewell is a tank found on many fishing boats that is used to keep bait and caught fish alive. It works by pumping fresh water from the surrounding body into the tank, as well as keeping the water aerated.

Most live wells on boats are made of fiberglass and usually coated with gelcoat. For more information on applying gelcoat see our How to Apply Gelcoat article.

In the case that your live well is aluminum you can apply Aluma Hawk, available in white, to the aluminum surface.

How To Mark Your Waterline for Bottom Paint

The waterline can also refer to anyline on a ship’s hull that is parallel to the water’s surface when the ship is afloat in a normal position. There are many reasons a waterline needs to be marked, it is a new vessel, the old paint has been blasted off for a new finish, or you’ve loaded it up with more stuff the original marking is off. Marking the waterline is often met with dread and getting the correct line for your bottom paint will provide stunning results. Getting it wrong, especially when paired with a boot stripe, will stand out like a sore thumb.

If your boat is new, the waterline should be marked on the designer’s drawing, if that is available. If not, you can take the measurements from a similar boat. If the boat has been in the water, even a few days, there may be some slight staining along the waterline (or just float the boat) that can be marked with a grease marker (best if it is full with fuel). Others have advised to throw sawdust in the water around the boat. Haul the boat and see where the sawdust has stuck to the wet hull.

Fine-line masking tape is ideal for this because it has some stretch and conforms very well to hull shape, especially if the hull has a lot of reverse turns. Don’t press the tape too firmly yet – you may need to peel it back for small adjustments. Once you’re happy with the whole line, press the tape firmly against the hull. Since the boat is already level, all you have to do for the second side is to set the level at the correct height and mark the stern with a piece of tape or transpose the wax crayon mark.

When the boat is aligned athwartships, set up the laser tripod, the exact spot is not critical providing the laser beam can see the whole side of the boat (if you can see it, so can the laser beam). Turn on the laser and adjust the height of the beam until it touches the marks you made at the bow and the stern. If it touches the mark on the bow but the stern is too high, lower the jack-stands at the stern or raise those at the bow—vice versa if the stern is low. Double-check the spirit level in the cockpit to make sure you’re not tilting the boat.

Can I change the color or tint my paint?

For most paints, in order to guarantee efficacy, the only way we recommend changing the color of  paints is to mix like paints, ie. Mixing Aluma Hawk with Aluma Hawk. We do not recommend addition of “universal” tints or pigments into our products. Many customers desire an antifouling paint in a deep, dark blue and this can be achieved by mixing blue and black.

Gel coats and resins can have a tint added, no more than 1 oz per quart, which can limit the effect. Another option is to mix two gelcoat colors, such as white and red for pink.

 

 

Application of Topside Mega Gloss by Blue Water

Learn how to apply Mega Gloss Gold and Mega Gloss by Blue Water Marine Paints

mega glossPrepping & priming for topside work
Mega Gloss by Blue Water Paint provides a beautiful aesthetic finish, and also provides protection against – sea, rain, wind and sun.
Blistering UV rays will degrade the surface of fiberglass and prematurely age your vessel. Moisture can also cause as many problems for wooden vessels and metal boats.

  • Clean and prepare the hull by first washing with soap and water and finish with fresh water. Then wipe the surface with a rag that has been dampened with Naptha.
  • After preparing the surface, sand with 220-320 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper. Remove sanding residue by wiping with a rag that has been dampened with Naptha.
  • Apply 1-2 coats of Mega Gloss Primer, and 2-3 coats of Finish Paint. Sand between coats with 320-400 grit. If the paint is peeling, cracking or generally showing signs of separations over the whole area, you need to remove the coating.

Applying topside paint
• Stir the paint thoroughly using a stir stick. Stir the can occasionally during work.
• Application methods for all paints include brush,roller or spray.
• It is best to paint on warm dry mornings – cold weather retards the drying of paint and dampness will spoil the gloss.
Brush – Long flexible bristles are best for gloss paints. Apply by brush, spreading with horizontal strokes before finishing with light vertical strokes. To minimize brush marks, hold the brush at a 45° angle.
Roller – A good gloss can be obtained using a high density / small cell foam roller. This will minimize the formation of bubbles in the surface. It is best to roll in one direction and tip off in another direction.
Thinners can be added as you work to maintain working viscosity.
• Pour the amount you expect to use in 30 minutes into a separate container.
• Once topcoat painting is complete, it should be kept dry for at least 24 hours, and 7–10 days should be allowed for full curing to take place.
• Do NOT use or incorporate any flow control agents like Penetrol®.

Topside paint hints / tricks
mega glossMega Gloss™ can be made to be a non-skid texture for decks by the addition of Non Skid, by adding to the paint and applying 2 coats.

Application of a topside primer will provide additional depth of color, adhesion and durability.

  • The best method is to apply with a roller, and then tip off with a large brush with long flexible bristles.
  • Use a diagonal brushing method at 45 degrees, followed by horizontal and then vertical strokes.
  • The best roller is a solvent resistant foam roller, which will reduce bubbles.
  • Use a top quality fine line masking tape for good crisp lines and no residual glue left on the hull.

Why do the majority of boaters paint with 1-part paint?
Alkyd enamels, and modifications of alkyd enamel technology, have been the work horse products in the marine industry for approximately fifty years. Generally, they dry reasonably fast, are easy to apply and have very good weathering characteristics. More alkyd enamels are still used than any other enamel type.

Can topside paints be applied to below water surfaces?
Most topside coating systems if constantly immersed or kept wet will tend to blister. Provided the boat is only put into the water for a few days then a topside coating can be used below the waterline.

What’s the best way to get a good finish with topsides paints?
You must lightly sand the surface and then use a good roller or brush. Thin when needed for proper flow and performance

What Equipment is Needed to do a Proper Application of Antifouling Bottom Paint?

Here are the items that you will need in addition to the bottom paint for the proper bottom paint application.

60–100 grit – Suitable for the removal of paint or to sand gel coat prior to the application of antifouling paint.
• After sanding remove sanding residue by wiping with a cloth that has been dampened with the proper solvent.
Masking Tape – When it is necessary to mask off areas use a high quality clean edge masking tape, especially when the masking tape will be left on the surface for a long time.
Brushes – For antifouling paints use a natural bristle brush but not necessarily one of as good quality as you would use to apply topside finishes.
Rollers Most solvent resistant rollers will have a phenolic core and will say that they are for use with oil based paints or epoxies. For antifouling paint and epoxy primers, use a 3/8”-1/2” nap roller

For convenience, you can find most needed supplies in our Paint Application Kit.

Ideal Temperatures for Applying Paints and Gelcoats

When applying coatings in cooler temperatures it is important that you meet the minimum temperature requirements. This information can typically be found in the products technical data sheet, or on the can label.

As a general rule, coatings should be applied in good weather when air and surface temperatures are above 50°F (10°C) for most paints and 60°F (16°C) for epoxy, resin, and gelcoats . Surface temperature must be a least 50°F (10°C) above dew point. For optimum application properties, bring material to 70-80°F (21-27°C) temperature range prior to mixing and application.

Tips:

  • Make sure to store the coatings inside to keep the temperature in the optimal range prior to application.
  • Do not let coatings freeze, as this may alter the chemical integrity of the products.
  • In warm (hot) conditions be sure to keep the coatings out of direct sunlight exposure.

Coatings such as resins and gelcoats that require MEKp to be added for curing will require more MEKp in cooler conditions, and less MEKp in warmer conditions. See the guide below, but refer to the specific coating’s technical data sheet for detailed information:

MEPk Levels

MEkp Concentration Levels

 

PropOne Vs. PropGlide

It is widely accepted that a build up of marine life on the surface of a boat’s propeller and drive shaft negatively impacts engine efficiency and performance. Even if the prop has a thin layer of growth on it’s surface area, fuel efficiency is reduced by a significant amount. To counter this problem, engineers have turned to developing “super-slick” coatings. When the drive is engaged, and the prop begins to move, any organisms attempting to adhere to the prop simply slide right off! No chemicals are used to poison or kill the organisms in the environment.

How do PropOne* and PropGlide compare?

Which coating gives you the most bang for your buck?

PropGlide is much newer to the market than PropOne, but has been in development for over ten years. Being new to the slick coating market, PropGlide appears to be able to avoid slipping into the same ruts that their competitors have. The biggest obstacle for PropOne is the cost. Comparing the two products at price point, PropGlide is about 30% less expensive and offers 25% more product. That’s 2 strikes for PropOne right off the bat. PropOne is available in the following sizes: 1000mL, 500mL, and 250mL. On the other hand PropGlide offers a size larger than PropOne’s 1000mL and still manages a lower cost. Also PropGlide offers a size smaller than PropOne’s 250mL for sailboat owners who don’t need the larger quantities of product. (For more information on choosing the right size of PropGlide, see this Coverage Chart.)

In terms of performance, both slick coatings are equally good. They do the job and do it well. It is too early to say which product will outlast the other in the minds of consumers. But for right now, we recommend PropGlide as opposed to PropOne. The savings alone makes PropGlide worth every penny.

 

 

 

 

*PropOne was formerly known as PropGold. It is essentially the same product, just a different brand name.

**This PropOne review and PropGlide review is the sole opinion of BottomPaintStore.com

***Above PropOne prices and PropGlide Prices are based on internet web search December 2016.

PROPGLIDE TECHNICAL DATA & APPLICATION GUIDE

PropGlide is an environmentally friendly foul release coating for boat propellers and running gear which prevents the attachment of marine growth by low critical surface tension. PropGlide does not contain cuprous oxide or TBT compounds or any other toxic substances which might cause environmental pollution. PropGlide is sold in 4 size kits. Sailboat, Small, Medium and Large. For the best size kit for your application see: Which PropGlide Kit Size Do You Need?

Each PropGlide Kit contains various sizes of Primer Base (Part 1), Primer Hardener (Part 2), and a Clear Top Coat.

  • propglide foul release coatingSailboat Kit 175ML Kit (#PCK-175) Contents: 60ML Primer Base, 15ML Primer Hardener, 100ML Clear Topcoat
  • Small Kit 250ML Kit (#PCK-250) Contents: 120ML Primer Base, 30ML Primer Hardener, 100ML Clear Topcoat
  • Medium Kit 625ML Kit (#PCK-625) Contents: 300ML Primer Base, 75ML Primer Hardener, 250ML Clear Topcoat
  • Large Kit 1125ML Kit (#PCK-1125) Contents: 2-300ML Primer Base, 2-75ML Primer Hardener, 2-250ML Clear Topcoat

This PropGlide Technical Data & Application Guide will detail how to apply any size kit of PropGlide by detailing the best preparation of the surface and application of the etching primer, and the final application of the Clear Topcoat.

Preparation of the Surface

The preparation of the surfaces to be coated with PropGlide is the key for the product to work effectively.

1. Remove previous coatings, fouling organisms/marine growth from metal surfaces. All substrates that are to be coated with PropGlide must be bare metal. These areas should be machine sanded with a Dual Action sander fitted with a soft pad and 60-80 grit abrasive discs sandpaper. Sanding the surface by hand is recommended at hard-to-reach areas where the dual action sander cannot reach. Use 60 – 80 grit wet/dry sandpaper, with water as a lubricant. Make sure the sand paper is changed frequently to ensure the necessary profile is achieved. Hand sanding these hard-to-reach areas is required to ensure the surface is properly abraded. The shaft should be done with hand sanding rather than using a machine. From this point forward, there shouldn’t be any direct hand contact to areas which are to be coated with PropGlide. It is advisable to wear latex gloves as it will ensure the areas to be painted remain clean and sound.

2. Once the surface sanding process is completed, wash all the areas with clean fresh water and wipe with clean, lintfree cotton rags soaked in water to wipe off sanding residue. Continue doing this until the rags don’t show any sign of residue, contaminants or discoloration.

3. After cleansing with water is completed, use a rag soaked in acetone or denatured alcohol to remove water on the sanded surface.

Continue to use the rag until it becomes dry from evaporation of the acetone or denatured alcohol. Use one or more rags as required, until the rag looks white clean, as there will be no contaminants when the rag is white clean. Again, care should be taken not to touch cleaned surfaces with bare hands. This is because fingers and hands contain oils which can transfer to the cleaned surfaces and therefore would inhibit the adhesion of the coatings.

Apply the Etching Primer

There is a Primer Base (Part 1) and a Primer Hardener (Part 2) to activate the primer base. This two-component etching primer dries chemically by reaction of the mixed components and provides protection against corrosion and increases the adhesive property of the subsequent coats. It may be used as a pre-treatment primer on non-ferrous metals such as bronze and aluminum as well as zinc and galvanised iron. May also be used as pre-treatment primer on blast-cleaned steel plates.

Temperature Limitations: Primer and Topcoat should be brought to 70-80°F (21-27°C) temperature range prior to mixing and application. Apply in good weather conditions when air and surface temperatures are above 50°F (10°C). Surface temperature must be a least 50°F (10°C).

PropGlide Etching Primer Physical Properties

  • Mixing Ratio: Primer Base (Part 1) : Primer Hardener (Part 2) = 4 : 1 by volume
  • Colour: Primer Base (Part 1) : Yellow, Primer Hardener (Part 2) : Clear
  • Dry Film Thickness: 8 microns
  • Drying Time: 5-15 minutes touch dry (temperature dependent)- 1 hour hard dry @ 20°C/68°F

Painting Interval: Apply PropGlide Clear TopCoat when Etching Primer is just touch dry Pot Life: 8 hrs @ 20°C/68°F

1. Agitate the Primer Base (Part 1) contents by scraping the bottom and sides of the can, as there will be settling. Mix contents of primer until the settled parts are incorporated back into solution and uniformly blended. Do not strain material, even if particles are present.

2. Stir Primer Hardener (Part 2) then add entire contents to the Primer Base (Part 1) container. Mix primer base and hardener for 30 seconds and apply mixture to sanded surface immediately after mixing.

3. Application of the Primer Base/Hardener mixture should be thin. The film should be thin enough, so that it is barely coating the surface, yet it does not provide sections or lines on the sanded surface that are not coated. Do not touch the primer mixture as it dries. The method of application of the primer may be done by using either a natural bristle brush or foam roller. 4. Apply a second coat of Primer Base/Hardener mixture after the first coat dries.

Apply the Clear Top Coat

The Clear Top Coat that should be applied to the last coat of Etching Primer within 5-15 minutes. The Clear Top Coat serves as a slick finish that will inhibit marine growth from attaching to the surface.

PropGlide Clear Top Coat Physical Properties:

  • Binder type: Silicone Polymer
  • Solvent: Xylene
  • Colour: Clear coating
  • Finish: Glossy
  • Dry time: 45 minutes touch dry ; 8 hours hard dry @ 20°C
  • Recommended film build: 75 microns per coat
  • Thinning: N/A
  • Clean up: Acetone
  • Shelf life: 12 months

1. After 5 to 15 minutes (depending on temperature) of applying the 2nd coat of Primer/Hardener mixture promptly apply the Top Coat. Application of Top Coat should be thicker than Primer/Hardener mixture, yet not thick enough so that the Top Coat produces runs. The Top Coat is to be applied with brush only, NO foam applicators are to be used.

2. Let the Top Coat dry overnight before launching.

Propspeed Vs. PropGlide

Propspeed ReviewFoul Release Systems Like Propspeed and PropGlide provide the best solution to keeping growth of your props and running gear. While these are not antifouling prop paints, they do keep the growth off buy creating a super slippery surface that the marine growth cannot stick to. Propspeed recommends that their kits by applied by a professional Propspeed applicator. On the other hand, PropGlide is available for any DIY applicator and is 30%+ less and more product for the money. If you want to apply this yourself, be sure to follow the details in the respective application manuals.   You can find these on any of the Propeller Foul Release Kit listed on our website.
PropGlide is newer to the market, but been in development for over ten years, while Propspeed  has been available for many years and is the leading brand name in the market place. The biggest issue with Propspeed is the cost. Very expensive!  PropGlide is also expensive but 30% less than Propspeed. In addition, you get 25% more product with PropGlide , so be sure to get the right size. You might be able to use a smaller size kit with PropGlide  which could then save you over 50%! You can find the comparison on PropGlide’s web site: Propspeed Compared

Performance of both coatings has been comparable, with much fewer complaints about PropGlide   Either they are just newer in the market with less complaints, or they truly have improved performance. Time will tell. At this point we recommend trying PropGlide  as a Propspeed alternative – since there is comparable performance with Propspeed, the cost savings alone is worth it! And PropGlide offers a sailboat size kit making it affordable now for sailboat owners.

This Propspeed review and PropGlide review is the sole opinion of BottomPaintStore.com

Note: Propspeed™ is a registered trademark of Oceanmax. Bottom Paint Store is not affiliated with Propspeed or Oceanmax in anyway. Above Propspeed prices and PropGlide prices are based on internet web search October 2016 .

PropGlide Frequently Asked Questions

logo-200x43 How does PropGlide work? PropGlide is a coating system that is applied to the props and underwater running gear of any vessel. Once applied, the PropGlide system reduces friction to the metal surface which greatly improves efficiency by not allowing growth to stick to the underwater metals. The result is an improvement in prop speed and fuel efficiency.

Is PropGlide toxic? Not at all. PropGlide contains no toxic biocides. It works be creating a super slippery surface not allowing growth to attach to the props and underwater metal.

Does PropGlide prevent barnacles and zebra mussels? No. It does not prevent from occurring. Barnacles and Zebra mussels will still grow. However, they will NOT attach. As soon as the vessel starts moving, the growth slides off with ease!

What can I expect after applying PropGlide to my props and running gear? You should expect growth not to stick to the properly prepared and kept surface while experiencing greater fuel efficiency and speed.

Can PropGlide be used in salt water and fresh water? Yes, PropGlide may be used in any type of water, including fresh water, salt water and brackish water conditions.

propglide foul release coatingHow long does it take to apply Propglide? The application time varies by the size of the prop(s) and running gear that you are covering, but typical application can be done in a few hours. Please see our application guidelines for detailed information. Note: Remember to wait overnight before launching your vessel!

Who can apply PropGlide? Unlike many other foul release coatings, you may apply PropGlide yourself by following the application guide, or you can contact a local boatyard or dealer in your area to apply it for you.

If I haul me boat after I have applied Propglide, will it still work after leaving the boat of the water? Yes, PropGlide can be left out of the water without affecting any performance of the system.

How long will PropGlide last? There are many factors that can affect the longevity of PropGlide including number of hours and kilometers traveled, various environmental factors including water temperature and purity. PropGlide will last 1-2 years depending on the above factors.

Can I recoat PropGlide for my next haul out? You must remove all of the old PropGlide by sandblasting, sanding, scraping, wire wheel or grinder. After all old PropGlide is removed down to the metal surface, clean the area to be primed with Xylol or Acetone. Recoat PropGlide using the application guidelines.

Which Non-Antifouling Paint is Recommended for Wood?

sailboat-1149519_640Painting a wooden boat on your own can be a daunting task. The amount of information about the correct way to paint a boat is staggering! First time boat owners may be at a loss when trying to make a plan for their first project. The Bottom Paint Store’s aim is to make this process as stress-free as possible so you can enjoy working on your boat and ultimately, enjoy the fruits of your labor!

If your boat stays in the water and growth is a concern you’ll want to use an antifouling paint for below the waterline and follow the manufacturers specs for application to a wood hull. See application instructions of ablative antifouling:

Step 1 – CLEAN SURFACE
Surface must be clean, dry and free of contaminants.
Step 2 – SAND & CLEAN
Sand to a uniformly frosty, dull looking surface with 80-100 grit (no finer)
sandpaper; remove any residue.
Step 3 – APPLY ANTIFOULANT
Apply two coats of Sea Hawk antifouling by brush, roller or spray.
Apply first coat thinned 20% and let dry overnight. Apply two more
coats of bottom paint allowing 3 to 6 hours between coats and a
minimum overnight dry.*

Other Paint Products for Single Day Use

Here are some other products that are not recommended for long-term submersion but can be applied to wood-hulled boats.

Duralux Yacht Primerinterlux-brightside-polyurethane-28238-500x539duralux-topside-marine-enamel-high-gloss-gallon-10799-500x539 and Duralux Topside Marine Enamel

Pettit EZ Prime and Pettit Easypoxy

Interlux Pre-Kote and Interlux Brightside Polyurethane

For other Helpful “How To” Articles about Topside Boat Paint, Click one of the links below.

How to Apply Propspeed

 

Propspeed ReviewPropspeed is a coating system designed and proven to increase vessels’ speed and fuel efficiency and greatly reduce marine growth from bonding to metal surfaces below the waterline. Propspeed works because it’s slick, not because it’s toxic.

The Propspeed system can be applied to any metal surface below the waterline, including propellers, shafts, bow thrusters, rudders, trim tabs, struts, stabilizers, sea chests, sea strainers, keel coolers and through hull fittings. The Clear Top Coat without the use of the etching primer can be used on plastic based items such as underwater lights, composite propellers and plastic bow thrusters.

Propspeed System Limitationspropspeed application

The Propspeed  system has been developed over many years of trial and error and has been refined to give exceptional performance throughout the world.

• The preparation and application instructions should be followed to ensure you get a satisfactory result. Taking shortcuts will reduce the durability and longevity of the system.

• Propspeed should only be applied by a qualified applicator.

• As with any coating systems, environmental influences will vary the cure rate of the coatings and this needs to be taken into account by the applicator.

• We recommend a minimum application temperature of 5°C or 40°F with recommended humidity not exceeding 85%.

• Electrolysis of a vessel or even a vessel moored nearby can adversely affect the coating system of the running gear. Marinas with 400 volt supply to vessels are more prone to neighbors’ vessels being affected.

• Propspeed clear coat is a soft coating and is easily damaged by mechanical abrasion, fi shing tackle or ropes around the running gear. Vessels used in shallow, sandy areas are also prone to mechanical abrasion of the clear coat.

• Vessel owners using a dive service should inform their diver that Propspeed has been applied to the running gear, and any other areas, so that the diver can use proper cleaning methods to avoid damaging the Prospeed system.

• The Propspeed system is not recommended nor approved for use in aquaculture or contact with food products.

Propspeed Application Process

The Propspeed  application is a simple process, involving surface preparation, metal conditioning and a catalyzed etching primer, followed by a silicone based topcoat.

The process to apply Propspeed to your running gear isn’t difficult, but the process must be strictly adhered to in order to get a superior result. For this reason we strongly recommend using a Propspeed approved applicator, or an experienced marine painter.

Propspeed doesn’t require any special equipment in its application. All you need is: a dual action sander, some 80 grit sandpaper, both wet and dry, plenty of rags, plastic mixing containers, disposable brushes, disposable foam rollers, disposable plastic paint trays, mixing sticks, paper paint suits, disposable gloves, eye protection and dust sanding mask.

The application of Propspeed  can be broken down into five separate stages:

1. Metal surface preparation – sanding the surface or using Propstrip

2. Initial clean – using Propclean

3. Metal conditioning – using Propprep

4. Metal etching primer

5. Clear coat top coat

—————————————-

1. Metal surface preparation – sanding the surface or using Propstrip

As is the case with all surface coatings the preparation of the surface to be coated for the application of Propspeed is key. The old Propspeed coating needs to be removed completely before the new system can be applied.

Any previously applied Propspeed on propellers, rudders and drive shafts should be high pressure cleaned, removing all marine foul from surfaces, then be allowed sufficient time to thoroughly dry.

Propspeed can be removed by sanding using 80-grit sandpaper. A dual action or air driven sander can be used and difficult areas wet sanded by hand.

Propstrip Option

New to our range is the revolutionary Propstrip. This is a safe, low toxicity remover that is totally water neutralized. The product can reduce the labour cost to remove Propspeed by up to 70%, as well as reducing dust and noise in the boat yard, and cutting the expense of abrasives.

For yards without a water catchment process, this system also enables all of the waste and removed product to be captured and processed to a waste container. For this process we recommend the use of hessian or burlap sacking placed under the area, so the removed product washes off onto the sacking. The water will drain through the hessian sacking, capturing the old Propspeed, and the hessian sacking can be rolled up and all waste placed in the waste container.

Good work practice is always recommended with the wearing of protective hand and eyewear.

Mask off any surface of the vessel that the Propstrip could splash or drip onto.

Propstrip does the hard work for you. It’s easy to apply and easy to remove following these simple instructions:

• Make sure the area you are working with is totally dry: Propstrip DOES NOT like any moisture. Water de-activates the Propstrip completely.

• Ensure any areas that are not being treated are adequately protected from Propstrip.

• Dependent on the remaining wear layer of the silicone topcoat the Propspeed may first need to be abraded with 80 grit sandpaper. This enables the Propstrip to work more effectively by penetrating the silicone faster.

• Apply Propstrip liberally with a brush ensuring there is a thick coating on 100% of the surface being treated allowing for complete saturation of the part.

• In cold conditions, 10-15°C or 50-60°F, it could take up to 3 hours to release the old Propspeed or if colder, it may take longer than 3 hours.

• In hot conditions above 35°C or 95°F it may be necessary to ensure the treated area is in shade to prevent the application from drying out while performing its action. The product works faster in hot conditons, so within 1 to 3 hours you should begin to visually observe the discoloration of the old Propspeed.

• When the product has started to bubble and change colour, this is a good sign that it is doing its job. Test a small area with a scraper to see if it will freely release from the substrate. Once ready, wash with a hose or a bucket of water and a Scotch-Brite pad.

• Any remaining product is removed using a wet Scotch-Brite pad or wet/dry sandpaper.

2. Initial clean – using Propclean

Once the surface to be coated has had the old Propspeed chemically or mechanically removed its now time to clean the surface with the Propclean solution.

From this stage of the application forward there should be no direct hand contact with the areas that are to be coated with Propspeed. The reason for this is that the oils on your fingers and hands will be transferred to the surface that is to be coated and this may cause the coating to fail. Plastic or latex gloves should be worn at all times. If you need to change  gloves frequently then do so. Make sure you have an abundance of rags on hand for the next two steps.

Clean the surface with Propclean. Immediately wipe the surface with a clean dry rag. Repeat until there is no residue left.

3. Metal conditioning – using Propprep

Apply Propprep solution liberally with a clean rag or use the Propprep wipes. Immediately wipe the surface with a clean dry rag to ensure no residue is left.

Propprep is essential in the chemical preparation of the metal substrate to be coated with Propspeed. It contains ingredients that react with the metal creating a surface porous layer. This porous layer is key to ensuring penetration and completion of the self etching reaction of the primer to the metal substrate. Propprep also ensures that no free alkalinity, as a result of various soap/detergent washing, is present to interfere with the self etching primer reaction and adhesion to the metal substrate.

4. Metal Etching Primer

Ambient temperature has an effect on the application of Propspeed and the drying times of the Metal Etching Primer and the Clear Top Coat. We recommend a minimum temperature of 5°C or 40°F.

It is recommended to avoid applying the product in direct sunlight or humidity above 85%.

Open the can of etching primer. The yellow pigment in the bottom of the can must be thoroughly

mixed before adding the etching primer hardener. This can be done quite easily using a mixing stick or Propspeed Paint Stir Wheels. This usually takes no more than two or three minutes.

Note: Failure to thoroughly mix the etching primer base, as described above, may lead to premature hardening, inconsistencies and short life expectancy of the final coating system.

Once the etching primer base has been thoroughly stirred and there are no solids left in the bottom of the can you can now add the etching primer hardener to the etching primer base. The mixing ratio of etching primer base to etching primer hardener is four parts base to one part hardener. However we recommend that you mix the etching primer hardener right into the etching primer base container thereby ensuring an accurate measurement. Once mixed together, use immediately. Any product not being used immediately can be left in the sealed can in the shade for up to six hours. You can apply your primer with brushes and or foam rollers. For spray applications, please consult your Propspeed Technical Representative regarding specialized projects such as keel coolers and sea strainers.

The application process must be well planned due to times in between coats and may require two applicators. The timing of each coat is essential to enable the required chemical bond between coats.

The Propspeed system requires two generous coats of etching primer. To access all parts of the propeller and shaft we recommend turning the prop using a brush, wooden stick, or gloved hands. Once you have applied the first coat of etching primer wait approximately 3 to 5 minutes before applying the next coat.

To test if it is ready use the dry-to-touch test method.

If you take your index finger in a glove and touch the wet etching primer and it leaves a small print on the primed surface but no etching primer transfers to your fingertip of your glove, then you can begin applying the next coat. The wait between coats of etching primer is very important and must be adhered to. Make sure you have some idea of how time is progressing.

Using 27°C or 80°F as a benchmark you have 3 to 5 minutes from the start of applying the fi rst coat of etching primer to the start of applying the second.

Cooler temperatures will slow down the recoat time between the two coats, as will warmer temperatures and windy conditions speed-up the recoat time between the two.

5. Clear Top Coat

Before applying the clear coat take another paint stick and stir the clear coat so you have a smooth, homogeneous mixture in the can. The 3 to 5 minute wait between coats applies here too – use the dry to touch test to check if the etching primer has dried suffi ciently before applying the clear coat. Apply the clear coat with a brush only, NO foam roller application is to be used here. The clear coat is applied and brushed much like conventional varnish. As with the etching primer to access all parts of the propeller and shaft we recommend turning the prop using a brush, wooden stick or gloved hands.

Make sure there are no heavy runs or sags in the clear coat. You’ll have anywhere from 5 to 10 minutes to touch these up. Any drips that harden on the edges of the propeller blades can be carefully cut off the following day.

Make sure the surface is completely coated with clear coat. Any missed areas will appear dull in luster.

When you have fi nished coating the entire propeller with clear coat, give the propeller one more visual inspection just to make sure there are no areas that you might have missed and to check again that there are no runs in the clear coat.

Once the running gear has been coated clean up the contaminated waste products and dispose of as required by your local council or marine laws.

Propspeed requires a minimum of eight hours to dry before launching. In cold conditions, 5-13°C / 40-60°F, we recommend at least 24 hours drying before launching. Unlike traditional bottom paints Propspeed’s effectiveness is not adversely affected by sitting out of the water for extended periods of time in warm or cold climates. Any coated areas will need to be protected from damage.

Propspeed Tips

• Application of Propspeed requires planning so make sure you have all of the required application equipment and thoroughly understand the process.

• Wear protective respiratory, eye and skin protection.

• Remember to remove all of the solids at the bottom of the primer container and stir it into a homogeneous mixture before applying the primer hardener.

• Be sure to keep track of time between etching primer coats and the clear coat. The 3 to 5 minute re-coat windows are critical and subject to your ambient application temperature.

• Be sure and brush out sags or drips in the etching primer before applying the clear coat.

• Install all zincs or tape off areas where zinc anodes will be placed before applying Propspeed. Be sure to carefully remove any tape that has been applied before the Prospeed is fully cured.

• When coating the blades of the propeller remember to start in the hub area and work your way out to the end of the blade.

• The Propprep solution does not contain corrosive inhibitors so the treated surface should be primed and coated with the clear coat as soon as possible after being treated, and defi nitely within 4 hours.

• When applying the clear coat be sure to stretch the material out just as you would on the last coat of varnish on any bright work.

• We highly recommend two people work together on each application.

• After completing the application of the clear coat, visually observe all areas, ensuring there are no misses or gaps. The clear coat will dry to a glossy fi nish, helping the applicator fi nd any uncoated areas.

• During cleaning of your hull only use a soft cloth on the Propspeed. If the wiping cloth collects shells remove them before proceeding with the wipe down so as not to damage the Propspeed. Avoid any abrasive cleaning materials or direct high-pressure water.

• When hauling your vessel assess the Propspeed condition and reapply if necessary. Most owners reapply Propspeed at the same time as antifoul.

Propspeed Frequently Asked Questions

How does Propspeed work? Propspeed’s unique “foul release” formulation produces a surface that does not allow marine growth to permanently attach.

• What are the benefi ts of Propspeed? Propspeed will keep your running gear free from marine growth and will increase your vessel’s speed and reduce your fuel consumption.

• Is Propspeed environmentally friendly? Yes. Propspeed contains no tin, copper, biocides or pesticides.

• Is Propspeed good value? Absolutely! For years boaters have asked for a coating to keep their running gear free of marine growth. Propspeed not only delivers a coating that answers this call, but will deliver higher speeds and fuel savings, when compared with unprotected running gear.

• How long should Propspeed last on my vessel? Propspeed should last at least one year but many customers report up to two years of service.

• Do I need anything to maintain my Propspeed application? Propspeed’s unique “foul release” formulation is self-cleaning. However, it is acceptable if your diver gently wipes Propspeed with a non-abrasive cloth, rinsing frequently to avoid collecting shells.

• Can I haul my vessel multiple times without having to re-apply Propspeed? Yes. Propspeed can be hauled and launched multiple times without affecting its performance.

• Who should apply Propspeed to my vessel? We recommend that you have a certified applicator apply Propspeed to your vessel.

• Can I use Propspeed on my Kiwi Props? Yes you can. Preparation is similar to any other Propspeed application, except you do not need to apply the etching primer, just apply the Clear Coat after normal preparation.

• Can I spray Propspeed? We do not recommend the spraying of the clear top coat as it is a silicone based product which can easily contaminate other vessels in the yard if not handled correctly.

• Where can I fi nd the Safety Data Sheets and the Technical Data Sheets on Propspeed products?see links below

The above information was obtained via the Propspeed Application Manual and updated 8/29/2016. For the most up-to-date information please review the Propspeed OceanMax website.

Helpful Links:

Propspeed Application Guidelines

Propspeed Coverate Rates

Propspeed Technical Data:

Propspeed Etching Primer Techincal Data Sheet

Propspeed Clear Coat Techincal Data Sheet

Propspeed Safety Data

Propspeed Etching Primer SDS (MSDS)

Propspeed Clear Coat SDS (MSDS)

Note: Propspeed™ is a registered trademark of Oceanmax. Bottom Paint Store is not affiliated with Propspeed or Oceanmax in anyway. Above Propspeed prices and PropGlide Prices are based on internet web search October 2016 .

How to Prevent Growth on Boat Propellers and Running Gear

So you have gone to the expense of applying bottom paint to your boat, and now you have to ask the question “what about propeller paint and running gear paint? Just like the rest of the bottom of the boat, marine growth will cover the props and running gear if left unprotected. This will lead to loss of power and speed. With severe growth, you can even lose the ability to get the boat on plane.

There are a few options for keeping growth off your propellers and running gear and we will explore advantages and disadvantages for applying various coatings to your propellers and running gear. Keep in mind that when you paint props and running gear they are under extreme conditions with speed, cavitation, electrolysis and environmental conditions ( like running through sand or hitting ground or objects). These can cause the same result as sandblasting your running gear – something you will want to avoid after you choose a coating!

1. PropGlide Foul Release Coating | The Best Solution for Preventing Growth on Props and Running Gear

Advantages: Best adhesion, best performance, actual increase in speed, lowest risk of electrolysis issues, non-toxic
Disadvantages: Higher Cost, Environmental Variables (sand, running aground), Detailed application

Foul Release Systems provide the best solution to keeping growth of your props and running gear. While these are not antifouling prop paints, they do keep the growth off buy creating a super slippery surface that the marine growth cannot stick to. Propspeed recommends that their kits by applied by a professional Propspeed applicator. On the other hand, PropGlide is available for any DIY applicator and is less costly and more product for the money. If you want to apply this yourself, be sure to follow the details in the respective application manuals.   You can find these on any of the Propeller Foul Release Kit listed on our website.

PropGlide and Propspeed are foul release systems that are applied to underwater metals including props and running gears. These foul release coatings are sold in kits ranging from 175ML, 200ML, 500ML, and 1000ML Kits. You can view the all of our Foul Release Coatings to determine which kit size if right for you.

2. Paint the Props and Running Gear with Bottom Paint

Advantages: Lower cost option
Disadvantages: Trouble staying on, electrolysis concerns, Environmental Variables (sand, running aground)

Applying bottom paint to your underwater gear is a little tricky because there are additional steps that must be taken before applying the bottom paint. Especially if you have a fiberglass boat. Most bottom paints contain copper that act as a biocide and prevent growth. However, when applying bottom paint (with copper) to metal, you create a battery effect with the metal on metal. This leads to electrolysis and pitting of your props and running gear. Follow these basic steps before going with this option

Basic Steps

  1. Prep: Make sure to remove all prior coatings and contaminants prior to applying any coatings. The should be done by a sandblasting, soda blasting, or a good ole fashioned sanding. The recommended grit and profile should be 80 grit. This will provide a efficient surface for the new coating to adhere.
  2. Tuff Stuff Marine Epoxy PrimerPrimer: Apply a two part high build epoxy primer that id designed to prevent corrosion and enhance adhesion. The best we have found is Sea Hawk Tuff Stuff High Build Epoxy Primer. It is easy to use and works extremely well. Apply two coats!
  3. Bottom Paint: Apply a hard modified epoxy bottom paint with not too high a load of copper. Sea Hawk Sharkskin and Blue Water Copper Shield 35 Hard are among the best choices. The epoxy primer will insulate the copper bottom paint from the metal of the props and Sea Hawk Smart Solution Outdrive Paintrunning gear (remember the battery effect!) If you are concerned about electrolysis or already have some issues, then you should use a copper free bottom paint. The only true metal free bottom paint that we found and that still is effective in preventing growth is Sea Hawk Smart Solution. Either way, be sure to apply the first coat of bottom paint the same day as the 2nd coat of epoxy primer. If you don’t, it will not stick!

3. Aerosol Sprays

Advantages: Lowest cost option
Disadvantages: Trouble staying on, ineffective antifouling performance. electrolysis concerns, Environmental Variables (sand, running aground)

There are a few aerosol spray systems that can be used, but these are generally ineffective for props and running gear, and are reserved for outdrive applications. These include Interlux Trilux 33 and Primocon, Pettit Alumaspray and Prop Coat Barnacle Barrier, and the Sea Hawk Premium Outdrive Kit that contains Smart Solution (brush on Pint) and Barnacle Blocker. Our advise is to save your money before applying these to props and running gear.

 

Note: Propspeed™ is a registered trademark of Oceanmax. Bottom Paint Store is not affiliated with Propspeed or Oceanmax in anyway. Above Propspeed prices and PropGlide Prices are based on internet web search October 2016 .

How To Patch a Hole in a Fiberglass Boat

A major fiberglass repair, such as patching a hole, can be a daunting task. Watching a professional do the job can help you get on the right track and be confident in doing the repair yourself. This step-by-step video tutorial produced by Sea Hawk Paints will show exactly what needs to be done when patching a hole in your fiberglass boat.

Note: Before attempting a repair by yourself, get a professional opinion. Always wears Personal Protective Equipment when sanding or working with chemical compounds! Respirator, safety glasses and gloves are always recommended.

Here is a list of products you will need for the repair:

  1. Hawk Epoxy Resin Kit – It contains the epoxy resin, catalyst and filler for the job.
  2. F5 Light Density Filler
  3. Biaxial Fiberglass matting
  4. 50 grit, 80 grit, and 100 grit sandpaper or grinding pads

Hawk Epoxy Video Tutorial

For more information see these other How To Articles:

Filling a Hole in Fiberglass

How Do I Choose Hawk Epoxy Catalyst and Fillers?

How to Mix Hawk Epoxy Resin Properly

Fairing Hull Imperfections

 

How to Get Strong Hardware Adhesion with Hawk Epoxy

hawk-epoxy-Large-May-20141What is the best way to achieve maximum adhesion when replacing your boat’s hardware? This How To article will give you the basic knowledge you need to get your repair done correctly.

Note: Before attempting a repair by yourself, get a professional opinion. Always wears Personal Protective Equipment when sanding or working with chemical compounds!

Here are some simple steps to follow when bonding hardware to your boat:

  1. Sand both the surface and the hardware to get maximum adhesion.
  2. Wet out the surface with Hawk Epoxy.f2-filler-large-may-2014-150x150
  3. Wait a few minutes for it to soak in.
  4. Wet out the Hardware base with Hawk Epoxy.
  5. Mix another batch of Hawk Epoxy with F2 Structural Adhesive Filler.
  6. Coat the hardware base, screw threads, and surface mount with the epoxy/filler compound.
  7. Tighten hardware bolts until some epoxy mixture squeezes out.
  8. Use your finger to fillet the excess mixture around the hardware base for extra strength.
  9. Before using the hardware, allow the bond to cure overnight.

Hawk Epoxy Video Tutorial

For more information see these other How To Articles:

How Do I Choose Hawk Epoxy Catalyst and Fillers?

How to Mix Hawk Epoxy Resin Properly

Filling a Hole in Fiberglass

Fairing Hull Imperfections

Fairing Hull Imperfections

hawk-epoxy-Large-May-20141What is Fairing?

Fairing is process of smoothing out and restoring the damaged surface of the hull. A fairing compound such as Epoxy resin can be used to fill in divots or gouges and then be sanded to a smooth finish. This restores the surface to its original shape and also prepares it for painting.

Note: Before attempting a repair by yourself, get a professional opinion. Always wears Personal Protective Equipment when sanding or working with chemical compounds!

Here are some guidelines to fairing out imperfections in your hull:

  1. Sand all loose surface debris and hard edges.f5-filler-large-may-2014
  2. Rid surface of debris with clean cloth.
  3. Wet out surface with Hawk Epoxy.
  4. Mix another batch of Hawk Epoxy with F5 Light Density Filler and apply to repair area.
  5. Use long strokes to spread out filler compound over the damaged hull. Apply until the mixture is slightly raised above the hull surface. Make sure the compound extends beyond the repair area.
  6. Let cure 6 hours.
  7. Add skim coat of F5 Filler / Epoxy compound to achieve a very smooth surface. Let cure.
  8. Sand the repair to the desired shape with 80 grit sandpaper.
  9. Finish by applying another 2 or 3 layers of Hawk Epoxy Resin.
  10. The surface is ready to be painted!

Hawk Epoxy Video Tutorial

For more information see these other How To Articles:

How Do I Choose Hawk Epoxy Catalyst and Fillers?

How to Mix Hawk Epoxy Resin Properly

Filling a Hole in Fiberglass

How to Get Strong Hardware Adhesion with Hawk Epoxy